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Discovering Santa Tere: A Stroll through Guadalajara's Most Beloved Neighborhood



Santa Tere has been my favorite neighborhood in Guadalajara for many years. It's not because of its architecture, of course, as it has nothing to boast about in that regard. It lacks a church and a square like the Santuario, or a market like the IV Centenario in the Capilla de Jesús, or a colonial monument like San Juan de Dios. What it does have is life and pride. The neighborhood is so vibrant that if it were to become independent tomorrow, the Sister Republic of Santa Tere would be a self-sufficient (or nearly self-sufficient) economy.


Santa Tere is a working-class neighborhood from the time of Guadalajara's expansion in the 20th century. Moreover, it's not even called Santa Tere officially; its official name is Colonia Villaseñor. However, thanks to the tenacity of its inhabitants and the stubbornness of Father Román Romo, the eternal parish priest of the Church of Santa Teresita, the neighborhood grew, evolved, had public services, and acquired a name that its residents wanted: Santa Tere.




The Essence of Santa Tere


The essence of Santa Tere is enriched by the diversity of people who have made this iconic neighborhood their home. From renowned painters like José Clemente Orozco, whose masterpieces adorn internationally renowned museums such as "The Man on Fire" at the Hospicio Cabañas, or Rubén Méndez, whose exhibition is currently on display at the MUSA, to writers like Marco Aurelio Larios, a prominent author with his work "Barrio Santa Tere".





Art Everywhere


One of Santa Tere, GDL's most distinctive features is its vibrant art scene. From art galleries like Galería Estudio Diana and Galería Casa Luna to street murals, art is everywhere. I invite you to get lost in the streets and discover the works of talented local artists adorning the neighborhood walls. Additionally, you can explore exhibitions at Galería Juan Soriano and Galería Libertad, where you'll find a wide variety of styles and artistic expressions to delight your senses.





Coffee and Relaxation Spots


Santa Tere is the perfect place to enjoy a quiet afternoon in one of its cozy cafes. From independent coffee shops to classic eateries, there are options for every taste. Don't miss out on "Anónimo Bistro Café", "Sismo", and "Rin Tin Tin" to taste delicious coffees and enjoy in a cozy and relaxed atmosphere.




Authentic Flavors


The gastronomy in Santa Tere is an experience for the senses. From street food stalls to gourmet restaurants, the neighborhood offers a wide variety of flavors that reflect the cultural diversity of Mexico. Don't miss "Kamilos 333" for some "carnita en su jugo", "FONDA Mariquita" for some fried quesadillas, and "Los Yunaites" in the market for a unique experience.





Cultural Events


Throughout the year, Santa Tere hosts a variety of cultural events celebrating music, art, and creativity. From outdoor concerts to art exhibitions, there's always something exciting to do in this vibrant neighborhood. Among the highlighted events is Mon Laferte's concert on March 20th, where fans can enjoy her energetic live music. Additionally, the third edition of the Vespa Festival, taking place on Saturday, March 16th, and Sunday, March 17th, will offer activities of interest for fans of these classic scooters. And for art lovers, you can't miss the Art Fest Auction on March 1st., featuring collaboration with MANIFESTO and Sofia Crimen as a special guest.






Santa Tere is much more than a neighborhood; it's a way of life. With its bohemian atmosphere, vibrant art scene, and delicious gastronomy, this corner of Guadalajara captivates all who visit it. So next time you're in the city, be sure to explore Santa Tere and discover everything this charming neighborhood has to offer. I promise it will be an experience you'll remember forever.


 

¡Have a nice experience in Santa Tere!



Check out the accommodations near this amazing neighborhood.





Written by: Pardela Editorial Team

Date: March 25th


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